16 Words That Can Mean Something Completely Different In The U.K.

1. Pants

What it means in the U.S.: Outerwear from the waist to the ankles; trousers.

What it means in the U.K.: Underwear.

Potentially confusing sentence: Wow, your mom has the nicest pants!

2. Braces

What it means in the US: Devices for straightening teeth.

What it means in the UK: Suspenders.

Potentially confusing sentence: I used to always get food caught in my braces as a kid.

3. Biscuit

What it means in the U.S.: A buttery, flaky bread served with savory meals.

What it means in the U.K.: A cookie.

Potentially confusing sentence: I can’t eat a biscuit unless it’s dripping in gravy.

4. First floor

What it means in the U.S.: The floor at ground level.

What it means in the U.K.: The floor above the ground level floor.

Potentially confusing sentence: That super-important meeting is taking place on the first floor – don’t be late!

5. Fancy dress

What it means in the U.S.: Formal attire.

What it means in the U.K.: Costume.

Potentially confusing sentence: Those girls invited us to a fancy dress party tonight. Now where can I get a tuxedo?

6. Trainers

What it means in the U.S.: A fitness expert who helps you work out.

What it means in the U.K.: Sneakers.

Potentially confusing sentence: Work out with trainers? What do I look like, a millionaire?!

7. Chaps

What it means in the U.S.: Leather leggings worn by cowboys designed to protect the legs whilst horseback riding.

What it means in the U.K.: Guys.

Potentially confusing sentence: Nothin’ sexier than a pair of assless chaps!

8. Comforter

What it means in the U.S.: A quilted bedspread.

What it means in the U.K.: A baby’s pacifier.

Potentially confusing sentence: I can’t fall asleep without my favorite comforter.

9. Cider

What it means in the U.S.: A nonalcoholic apple juice popular in the fall.

What it means in the U.K.: An alcoholic beverage derived from fermented apples, popular every season.

Potentially confusing sentence: I used to drink cider every day as a kid.

10. Knob

What it means in the U.S.: A rounded door handle.

What it means in the U.K.: A penis.

Potentially confusing sentence: I broke my knob rushing out of the house this morning.

11. Bin

What it means in the U.S.: A storage container.

What it means in the U.K.: A trash can.

Potentially confusing sentence: I put all my grandmother’s valuables in a bin.

12. Garden

What it means in the U.S.: A designated area for growing flowers or crops.

What it means in the U.K.: A backyard.

Potentially confusing sentence: No thanks, I don’t want to drink beers in your garden because I’m not a crazy person.

13. Rubber

What it means in the US: A condom.

What it means in the UK: An eraser.

Potentially confusing sentence: Why on EARTH would you give those school children rubbers?!

14. Pissed

What it means in the U..S: Angry.

What it means in the U.K.: Drunk.

Potentially confusing sentence: Sorry that I’m late for work. I got a parking ticket and I’m pissed.

15. Shag

What it means in the U.S.: Carpeting with particularly long and soft fibers.

What it means in the U.K.: Sex.

Potentially confusing sentence: Shag? Gross. What is this, the ’70s?

16. Football

What it means in the U.S.: Football.

What it means in the U.K.: Soccer.

Potentially confusing sentence: I don’t like football.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/erinchack/words-that-mean-something-completely-different-in-the-uk

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3 Ways Lunar New Year Celebrations Will Test Your Resolutions

With just a few weeks to the Lunar New Year (Monday, February 8, 2016), many western Asian families can anticipate the joys of spending time with relatives, copious amounts of food and drinks and those lucky red packets.

Continuing the New Year with such a bang is another great way to keep the good vibes flowing, while at the same time, putting your New Years resolutions to the test.

From those of us who promise to prioritize our health to the generous people who want to spend the rest of the year focusing on giving, the Lunar New Year (also known as Chinese New Year) will either remind you of your commitments or just downright diminish them.

Here are threeways the Lunar New Year challenges New Year’s resolutions:

1. Food, Booze And Tunes

Its no question that traditional home-cooked meals with relatives are often looked forward to, as well as the excuse to throw a memorable party that rivals even the New Years Eve one.

With so much culinary temptation floating around, will the health-conscious new you give in? Or will you stick to your diet plan?

Its disheartening to refuse home-cooked meals during the Lunar New Year, especially those made by grandmaster cooks such as your mom and your aunt.

Perhaps all the food is there to remind you that, although getting fit is a priority, you shouldnt sacrifice being in the moment all the time.

Instead, learn to enjoy the abundance and variety of food life can provide.


2. The Art Of Giving

Many younger generations are always happy to receive red packets from older relatives during this festive time of year.

The red packets contain both money and luck. The red packets are never given withouta wish fromthe giver, focusing on subjects such as financialluck, joy and success.

Of course, the receiver also wishes the giver well. In this way, a cycle of good fortune is reciprocated.

Your New Years resolutions may include something about being more generous, and you may even feel guilty being on the receiving end of things.

This custom is a challenge as, although youre trying to be generous, it is encouraged to understand that receiving is part of a healthy lifestyle.

T. Harv Eker spoke the truth in his financial strategy book, Secrets Of The Millionaire Mind,where he explained that by putting aside 10 percent of our income purely for play, we are ableto flex our receiving muscles.

In this way,we can learn to accept generosity with open arms.

Giving more than you receive is important, but refusing to receive can prove to be detrimental.


3. Connection Established

We’re not talking about aWiFi connection.

The Lunar New Year is all aboutfamilial connections.

Since family is the buzzword of the Lunar New Year, this provides a great opportunity for you to catch up with distant and not-so-distant relatives, even if it’s in a networking sort of way.

While manyNew Years resolutions beckon the notions tocatch up with old friends or network more, we could really thrive in the form of family gatherings during the Lunar New Year.

This also poses a challenge because it gives you barely a month (from January 1) to brush up on your social skills and connect with people on a deeper level.


Despite these reminders and challenges, its hard to deny that Lunar New Year celebrations are extremely enjoyable for all cultures alike.

From public street festivals with lion dances to private parties with too much rice wine, we can all agree that peoplewho havethe resolution to have less fun arekidding themselves.

However, the resolution to have more fun will be a piece of cake for you to achieve during the festive Lunar New Year.

Read more: http://elitedaily.com/life/lunar-new-year-resolutions/1342087/

The post 3 Ways Lunar New Year Celebrations Will Test Your Resolutions appeared first on Diet Guide To Everything.

This Is Why Dieting During The Holidays Is Completely Pointless

Tis the season when my inbox becomes saturated with things like dieting tips, ways to avoid gaining weight and the 47 kinds of miniature appetizers guaranteed to make me bloat. It’s barely the end of October and Im already tired of hearing about holiday diets, spandex undergarments and

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This Is Why Dieting During The Holidays Is Completely Pointless

Tis the season when my inbox becomes saturated with things like dieting tips, ways to avoid gaining weight and the 47 kinds of miniature appetizers guaranteed to make me bloat.

It’s barely the end of October and Im already tired of hearing about holiday diets, spandex undergarments and waist-trainers designed to make me look like Ive never inhaled air – let alone food – a day in my life.

When you think about it, the holidays should be the time of year you feel best about the person you’ve become. Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas are a time to enjoy rarely-appreciated relationships while sipping hot toddies and chewing on candy canes.

Unlike the average mid-week dinner, theres no pressure to rush home. These are the only weeks of the year I dont check my work email or think about deadlines looming. I choose to prioritizeothers over myself.

It follows, then, that I’d rather not drink a large glass of water or swallow a cup of broth before every party to avoid the dreaded extra calories of fancy food. I want to have my damn miniature twice-baked potato and eat it, too.

What Im saying is this: Holiday diets must die.

Holiday dieting is a remnantfrom the age of sexism.

In my experience, thediet is an outdated idea, especially asI watch women care more about counting reps at the weight rack than calories in theirdinners. While some eschew gluten and carbs, the majority choose to live with balance.

The concept of watching what I eat will always call to mind a frustrated Betty Draper in AMCs period drama Mad Men. Her flawed characteragonized over condiments and Weight Watchers points in an attempt to maintain the tiny waist that landed her two husbands in a row.

Our grandmothers and great-aunts watched their figures with beady, obsessive focus. They were taught that femininity and thinness were synonymous. Although theres nothing wrong with working for a healthy weight, obsessive food tracking often does more harm than good.

As women of 2015, we’re better than the diet. Christmas cookies arent a temptation for us, but rather a conscious decision. After a year filled with turning down extra desserts, a few frosted Santas arewell-earned.


Its about love and culture, not just calories.

For females, food is never just food. Each dish plays host to our emotions and nostalgia, built up like a seven-layer chip dip.

Holiday food, in particular, is more than just a meal (okay, three meals, when no one else is looking). Grandparents, aunts and cousins prepare favorite dishes with love. Not only is this your uncles sweet potato casserole on the dining table, but its also a recipe he saves just for his family.

Food brings people together, but rigid diets put up barriers. After hours preparing dishes, why look into your grandmothers eyes and tell her youre not interested in cranberry sauce? Shell be hurt, the exact opposite of how shes supposed to be feeling.

My fathers pizzelle cookies consist predominantly of oil and sugar, but its his chance to share a great aunts recipe while teaching his children about Italian culture. Its not the cookie thats important, so much as the act of making and munching them together.


One meal wont ruin a years worth of work.

Contrary to the beliefs of many a college girl, healthy lifestyles don’t just suddenly happen. Its the result of countless choices to eat your veggie burger without cheese or skip the side of fries. Regular trips to the gym count, too.

Thats why its so frustrating when magazines andwomen-oriented articles treat each meal as if its the end of the world, encouraging a distinctly damaging view of food.

People who eat cake and cookies at Christmas dont instantaneously become walrus-sized. (Furthermore, what do people have against walruses?)

Eating fatty food and tossing back a few cran-vodkas at the company holiday party doesnt mean Im indulging or spiraling. I may need to nap after Thanksgiving dinner, but if its the one meal I overeat in six months, Im not doing too badly.

Im still a healthy person. I’m in control of what I put in my body. The holidays are a time to be my best self, relaxed and happy. Its impossible to do that while monitoring every ounce my weight fluctuates.

This year, lets try a new strategy and calm the hell down about dieting. The holidays should be the best time of the year, not the most rigid.

Read more: http://elitedaily.com/women/holiday-diets-are-pointless/1265964/

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